[Video]: Podcast 8: Day 7, THE LEGACY - the Cold Hawaii family

The 2012 legacy - in BSP wrapping, just the way we like it. As if it knew it was time to stop, the wind dropped for the closing day of the 2012 Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup in Klitmøller on Sunday.

After a week of tough competition between the best 43 wave windsurfers in the world. After three successful years of competition, Klitmøller, for decades a place of pilgrimage for the windsurfers in the know, is now firmly on the professionals trail - enjoy ...

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/video-podcast-8-day-7-the-legacy-the-cold-hawaii-family

Cold Hawaii drives revolution with winds of Change

As if it knew it was time to stop, the wind dropped for the closing day of the 2012 Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup in Klitmøller on Sunday, after a week of tough competition between the best 43 wave windsurfers in the world. After three successful years of competition, Klitmøller, for decades a place of pilgrimage for the windsurfers in the know, is now firmly on the professionals trail. “It’s an established part of the tour now,” Rich Page, the PWA tour manager, said. “Klitmøller was an event that that had been years in the development phases working with Rasmus Johnsen (head of new media and technology at the Active Institute at the University of Aarhus) and then later with Robert (Sand, the event manager). So that when it came to fruition it was very well organised.

The ‘T’s had been crossed and the ‘I’s dotted and that gave it a solid foundation. It was never going to be a flash in the pan. That hard work has paid off and we expect it to continue to grow.”

And grow it has, driving a digital revolution in the sport. In their inaugural year in 2010, the organisers of Cold Hawaii brought live streaming video technology to the windsurfing World Cup for the first time and this year the introduction of live scoring by the PWA has helped revolutionise the sport.

The effects of spectators knowing the judges scores during heats for the first time was already having a discernable effect on heats. Friends, family, girlfriends and fellow competitors, were standing on the beach and letting sailors know – albeit with mixed success - that they needed to land another jump in the heat.

“It is only fitting that Denmark was the first event where we have that system up and running being an event that has driven a new generation of live interaction and social media in windsurfing, Page said.”

The Cold Hawaii World Cup has sustainability in its DNA. From being a beacon of light in north-west Jutland, reversing the trend of population migration away from the area to recycling, Klitmøller is setting new standards that it hopes will be adopted by the whole region.

At the heart of it all is one power; the wind. “What we have in the area is sustainable energy and ability to work with nature and nearly 95% of our electricity is from windmills,” Otto Lægaard, the Thisted municipality manager of the Green Thread, said.

The old fishing villages, along the 65km of the north-west Jutland coastline that has become known as Cold Hawaii, were slowly contracting before some became a mecca for windsurfers and the nature lovers generally.

“Cold Hawaii is special because it has a lot of different surf spots that cater for any wind and wave direction,” Sand, the Cold Hawaii World Cup event manager, Danish wave champion 2003-05 and a Klitmøller windsurfer for 25 years, said.

“The open water from the North Sea and North Atlantic draws in the low pressure systems that gain momentum as they travel across the top of the British Isles and then hit our coast.”

“As a result of the powerful North Sea south-westerlies, gusting up to 50 knots, and colossal seas, the windsurfers call this Cold Hawaii.” And they will keep coming as long as the wind blows.

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/cold-hawaii-drives-revolution-with-winds-of-change

[Video]: Day 6, highlights: KIA cold hawaii PWA World Cup

The penultimate day of the PWA KIA Cold Hawaii World Cup saw the superstars of the wave sailing world deliver a spectacular display, as the City Lift Super Session took place at 1pm. Light starboard tack winds and small waves provided ideal conditions for the competition, as three heats were run before the final, with the top two men from each heat advancing. The super session final consisted of three English sailors, John Skye (RRD / Mystic / MFC), Robby Swift (JP / NeilPryde / Mystic / Maui Ultra Fins), Jamie Hancock (Tabou / Gaastra), the Brazilian boys Marcilio Browne (Goya Windsurfing / MFC) and Kauli Seadi (JP / NeilPryde), and finally Spain’s, Victor Fernandez (Fanatic / North).

In the light winds and difficult jumping conditions Victor Fernandez was able to gain an early lead as he landed a tabletop forward, however his lead was short lived as Marcilio ‘Brawzinho’ Browne landed an amazing air chachoo. The Brazilian then went one better as he rotated his way through an outstanding one footed backloop to cement his place at the top. Browne’s fellow countryman, Kauli Seadi, completed the top three as he also landed a brilliant air chachoo to wow the crowds on the beach. The deteriorating wind in the final minutes of the heat meant that none of the sailors were able to land any more moves, and Marcilio Browne was crowned the super session champion.

Results of the City Lift Super Session:

1st Marcilio Browne (Goya Windsurfing / MFC) 2nd Victor Fernandez (Fanatic / North) 3rd Kauli Seadi (JP / NeilPryde)

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/video-day-6-highlights-kia-cold-hawaii-pwa-world-cup

Thomas Traversa: The secret of how I won the 2012 KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup

Thomas Traversa has revealed that the secret of his victory in the 2012 Cold Hawaii World Cup was that his friend Alex Mussolini forced him to take a bigger board on the beach five minutes before the final against Philip Köster on Thursday. “Alex ran to get the board to me and I trusted him,” Traversa said. Mussolini, who finished sixth and is third overall in the World Cup standings, is old friends with Traversa and was acting as his caddy on the beach.

“He wanted to go out with his 68 (litre) board but I knew he needed more weight because he is light and the conditions were so light,” Mussolini said. “I made the mistake of going out with my 68 in my heat the day before and I could not get upwind.”

“He didn’t want to take it and then we went down to the beach and he said: ‘Oh now I’m not so sure.’ So, I didn’t wait for him to change his mind, I ran and got my 74 litre board. That was five minutes before the start. He then adjusted the straps and put his own sail on just in time.”

“You saw that Philip was way too much downwind. I said to Thomas it was better for him to get 10 to 15 waves (in the heat) and make two good ones, rather than only get four and then the pressure is really on.”

“You need someone like this with you on the beach, to help with your gear and mentally, so you can concentrate only what you need to do on the water.”

Cold Hawaii was Traversa’s first victory on the World Cup tour and he is still on the party wave after beating Köster, the world champion. His girlfriend is in Klitmøller with him and his friends from around the world have been posting greetings on his facebook. They have also been celebrating the emergence of a new star of the tour, at his home in La Ciotat, the town near Marseilles, where the first movie was made by the Lumière brothers.

“Lots of people have been sending me congratulations. That's almost the best part about winning, to see my friends being so happy,” Traversa said. “My board-shaper, Fabien Vollenweider, called me immediately after the final. He was so proud. He always made my boards and I've known him since I was 12,” a happy and tired Traversa said.

Many of his fellow competitors on the tour have noticed a new discipline and focus in the big competitions in Traversa, who has always had talent, over the last couple of years.

But seven months ago such a victory looked unlikely after Traversa broke his left foot. That has happened three times by now. “When you're injured you get really frustrated but it also gives you time to think,” Traversa said. “And when you go out on water again you have a different mind and you sail smarter.”

Traversa used to compete as a professional in freestyle windsurfing. It was after an injury in 2008 (again a broken left foot) that Traversa decided to change to wave windsurfing.

“I did freestyle windsurfing since I was 16 to 23-years-old and I came third on Fuerteventura in 2007, that was my best result so far – but now it's first place in Cold Hawaii. I'm super happy about that,” Traversa said.

Next up for 26-year-old Traversa is the PWA World Cup in Sylt and then Red Bull Storm Chase. “I hope the Storm Chase will take place in Ireland,” Traversa said. ”I've been there a few times but not a lot of people go there. I like it there, it's wild.”

Traversa is an explorer. “I love to travel and I'm so happy that windsurfing gives me a reason to do it,” Traversa said. “I've been traveling a lot with Alex Mussolini, his wife and kid and my girlfriend Sophia. I really enjoy that, going new places and windsurfing in different conditions.” This year Traversa also went to Iceland and Madagascar.

Cold Hawaii has been a challenge for all the windsurfers with constantly changing conditions and colder temperatures than many are used to. “I don't mind the cold, once I'm in the water I don't freeze anymore,” Traversa said.

And the final question as he prepares to leave Klimøller: how did he become the first man to beat Köster for two years?

“I was chasing the good waves to get a high score,” he said. “I let a few pass to get on a bigger wave, that was my strategy. Since I'm light I could move around a bit more than Philip. I wasn't stressed about falling, I made a few good waves and that was enough. Philip was unlucky.”

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/thomas-traversa-the-secret-of-how-i-won-the-2012-kia-cold-hawaii-pwa-world-cup

[Images]: Impressions day 6, KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup

The penultimate day of the PWA KIA Cold Hawaii World Cup saw the superstars of the wave sailing world deliver a spectacular display, as the City Lift Super Session took place at 1pm. Light starboard tack winds and small waves provided ideal conditions for the competition, as three heats were run before the final, with the top two men from each heat advancing.

See the images

The super session final consisted of three English sailors, John Skye (RRD / Mystic / MFC), Robby Swift (JP / NeilPryde / Mystic / Maui Ultra Fins), Jamie Hancock (Tabou / Gaastra), the Brazilian boys Marcilio Browne (Goya Windsurfing / MFC) and Kauli Seadi (JP / NeilPryde), and finally Spain’s, Victor Fernandez (Fanatic / North).

In the light winds and difficult jumping conditions Victor Fernandez was able to gain an early lead as he landed a tabletop forward, however his lead was short lived as Marcilio ‘Brawzinho’ Browne landed an amazing air chachoo. The Brazilian then went one better as he rotated his way through an outstanding one footed backloop to cement his place at the top. Browne’s fellow countryman, Kauli Seadi, completed the top three as he also landed a brilliant air chachoo to wow the crowds on the beach. The deteriorating wind in the final minutes of the heat meant that none of the sailors were able to land any more moves, and Marcilio Browne was crowned the super session champion.

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/images-impressions-day-6-kia-cold-hawaii-pwa-world-cup

[Daily schedule]: Day 7, KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup

10:00 – 14:00: Cold Hawaii Boathouse Café is open13:00: The KIA Strong Man Side-event LIVE 14:00: Prize giving & celebrating the world champion LIVE

www.twitter.com/coldhawaii www.facebook.com/coldhawaiipenguin http://www.youtube.com/user/coldhawaiiworldcup http://www.flickr.com/photos/coldhawaiiworldcup/collections

Every day during the KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup, we’ll be running a Facebook competition. There are great prizes in store. If you haven’t already done so: LIKE us to be a part of the fun.

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/daily-schedule-day-7-kia-cold-hawaii-pwa-world-cup

[Video]: Day 5, highlights, KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup

The fifth day of the PWA KIA Cold Hawaii World Cup saw clean, chest to shoulder high waves rolling into Klitmoller, with light to medium cross shore wind. With the double elimination being completed yesterday, with Thomas Traversa (Tabou / Gaastra) there was no windsurfing competition today. However, there was still plenty of action on the water as a stand up paddleboard contest was held in the ideal conditions. After a leisurely start to the day ten riders signed up for the competition, consisting of Mor Meluka, Casper Steinfath, Klaas Voget (Fanatic / Simmer / MFC), Sebastian Kornum (JP / NeilPryde) and Leon Jamaer (Fanatic / Hot Sails Maui) in heat one. Whilst heat two saw Oliver Hartkopp, Peter Steinfath, Victor Fernandez (Fanatic / North), Lars Petersen (JP / NeilPryde / Maui Ultra Fins) and Albert Pijoan (Starboard / Severne) battling out for a place in the final.

The first heat resulted in Casper Steinfath and Sebastian Kornum advancing into the final, and they were soon joined by Peter Steinfath and Oliver Hartkopp. The final was extremely close between, the Steinfath brothers and Sebastian Kornum with each of them leading at one point or another. Kornum scored the wave of the day as he picked up a big set wave and rode it all the way to the inside with several nice smooth turns. As the scores were calculated there was a tie between Peter Steinfath and Kornum, as both sailors scored a combined score of 10.33 for their two waves. In the end the decision went in Steinfath's favor due to his greater fluidity and style on the wave.

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/video-day-5-highlights-kia-cold-hawaii-pwa-world-cup

Brawzinho Roars as windsurfers try a different Tack

Marcilio ‘Brawzinho’ Browne showed what a force he would be on the tour if there were more starboard tack events, by winning the 2012 KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup Super Session on Saturday. In a lighter than expected on shore northerly wind of 15 knots, Victor Fernandez Lopez demonstrated his class in the first 30 seconds with a table forward that brought him a series of 7 points from the judges. But with one jump counting to win the heat, Browne, born and raised on the starboard tack in Brazil, and now living on another one in Maui, took the lead with an air chacho. He then bettered it with a sweet one-foot back loop that scored 8s with the judges.

“It was a little bit tricky, I’m glad I got my jumps in at the beginning of the heat because then the wind dropped and I watched the guys planing back and forth,” Browne said. “I am not used to these cold conditions so my hands were numb.”

The rare conditions in Klitmøller meant it was first time in five years – since Guincho, Portugal in 2007 – that there has been a starboard tack jumping contest on a world tour dominated by port tack venues. Even had Philip Köster, the world champion, not been a no-show, he would have found it tough to beat Browne in these conditions.

Thomas Traversa, the Cold Hawaii World Cup champion, did enter and the starboard tack and the light airs favoured him, but his back loop was not good enough to get him out of the qualifying round led by Browne and Robby Swift.

Kauli Seadi, the triple world champion and one of the most ambidextrous on the tour, made it a Brazilian day, with an air chacho, but his wet landing meant 6.5s, which was enough for third place. As the wind slackened further in the second half of the heat, the scores dropped and there was little opportunity for the six riders in the final, including John Skye, Swift and Jamie Hancock, to better their scores.

Browne paid tribute to Seadi after. “When I was 15 my father trusted Seadi to take me with him travelling,” Browne said. “Without him I wouldn’t be standing here.”

Super Session

Final

Marcilio ‘Brawzinho’ Browne – one foot back loop Victor Fernandez Lopez – table forward Kauli Seadi – air chacho (wet) John Skye Robby Swift Jamie Hancock

Qualifying round one:

Jamie Hancock - Q – one-handed back loop. John Skye - Q – back loop Ricardo Campello Kenneth Danielsen Mikey Clancy

Qualifying round two:

Marcillo ‘Brawzinho’ Browne - Q – high back loop Robby Swift – Q – air chacho Ross Williams Thomas Traversa Antoine Martin

Qualifying round three:

Victor Fernandez Lopez – Q – table forward Kauli Seadi – Q – air chacho Tuomo Naallsvaara Markus Rydberg

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/brawzinho-roars-as-windsurfers-try-a-different-tack

Traversa Has Reversa in Super Session on Starboard Tack

The 2012 KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup Super Session on Saturday will be the first time in five years there has been a starboard tack jumping event on the world tour. It promises to level the playing field for Thomas Traversa, the Cold Hawaii World Cup winner, as Philip Köster, the 2012 world champion seeks to avenge his defeat by Traversa in the final on Thursday. With 18 knots of onshore northerly breeze building in the afternoon, the Super Session, a jump contest, is scheduled to start at 1310 local time. It is not the epic wind Klitmøller is famous for, but the rarity of the conditions - especially that they have arrived during this event - make it a collector’s item. And if Traversa won a jump event, they might have to call this unusual wind the ‘Raversa’.

“It only happens once or twice a year that you have suitable conditions, with strong winds from the north or north east, for a starboard tack jumping event in Klitmøller,” Robert Sand, the event manager and former Danish champion, who has sailed here for 20 years, said.

Traversa, from La Ciotat near Marseilles, was raised on the starboard tack, in the south of France. Marcillo ‘Brawzinho’ Browne, the Brazilian sailor, will also be contender in these conditions against the obvious favourites: Köster, Victor Fernandez Lopez and Ricardo Campello.

The tour has been dominated by port tack events over the last five years. There was an event in Cabo Verde in 2009, but that is predominantly a wave riding event. The last time the tour had a starboard jumping event was at Guincho, Portugal in 2007. Fernandez Lopez won that event, a single elimination competition, Kauli Seadi was second, Browne fourth and Traversa joint fifth.

Some port tack jumpers will probably fight shy of entering. As Duncan Coombs, the PWA head judge, explains, technically a double forward loop is just reversal of hand and foot positions, but psychologically and emotionally, some look like beginners when first attempting it.

“The difference is just that your right hand is forward on starboard tack and the wind’s coming from the righthand side,” Coombs said. “It might not sound like much but it’s all about the fact that the world tour has been on a port tack for five years, so you’re getting people not really needing to train on starboard tack. Boujmaa, (Guilloul, who was joint fifth in Guicho) from Morocco, where it’s always starboard tack, has struggled to get good results on tour and has dropped out. I would tip Brawzinho to be one of the favourites on the starboard tack.”

“I suppose it’s like comparing a backhand and a forehand in tennis. You see guys who can’t do anything on a starboard tack. It’s like watching a beginner.”

One rider said it was weird watching Köster first arrive in Maui and look like a fish out of water on the starboard tack after spending his life in Gran Canaria on port tack. But after three years he was up to speed, if not quite so natural.

“If you’re that good you pick it up on both tacks, it’s just the fact that you have to go and train on the other side to do it.” Coombs said.

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/traversa-has-reversa-on-super-session-on-starboard-tack

[Images]: Impressions day 5, KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup

We had a nice day at the KIA Cold Hawaii PWA World Cup, with an interesting SUP competition as the side-event for the day. The pro guys vs. some of the local talent, and with all local guys ending up at the podium, it ended up being a Cold Hawaii kind of day. Of course we have some images for you as well...

http://www.worldcup.coldhawaii.com/blog/images-impressions-day-5-kia-cold-hawaii-pwa-world-cup